Call Us
252-480-2689
  • Fully Insured
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus

Outer Banks Landscaping Tips

Are you planning to let your kid using one of your lawn mowers?

It’s spring on the Outer Banks and it’s time for your young adults in the house to learn the basics of landscaping on the Outer Banks which really means it’s time for them to learn how to use the lawn mowers. Experience counts in the world of using a lawn mowers, as it does in most things. Make sure before you send the kiddo out into the yard, that they can see the different obstacles of driving or pushing the mower on the lawn. Safety issues are paramount, but so is taking care of it, so you’ll not have to replace it post haste.

The lawn mowers have a rough life as it is, and new care takers need to be taken curbside, and shown the big picture of your lawn. Next, go around the lawn and point out the specifics of danger points where the lawn mowers and its blade can be damaged. In fact, in might be a good idea draw a rough picture layout of the yard, and mark the different places to look out for while you’re walking.

There are a lot of places where damage can occur. The blade rotating at a high speed doesn’t leave much time to react to unexpected situations. In fact damage happens to the most experienced users, and it’s certainly true for new barbers of the lawn. Be patient when teaching the kiddos about how to use the lawn mowers on the first few times of cutting the lawn.

A concrete driveway culvert is one place where both the blade and the lawn mowers can be damaged if not handled properly. If your driveway is covered in gravel it can wash away exposing the top and edging of the pipe. Also, if your yard has metal fencing, the bottom of it can become bent outward on to the lawn. Even the edging of a paved driveway or sidewalk can wear away at the lawn mowers too.

Another place where the blade can become bent is on tree roots. A tree like the water maple that grows in U.S. has huge surface ground roots. Often it only takes a couple of times to run over a tree root system like this to completely bend, or break a lawn mowers blade in half. If you live in a rural area with a septic clean out vent remember to tell them about shearing off the cap at ground level too. Metal water covers are another way a lawn mowers can be damaged.

Finally, before the kids get to using it the first few times, help them look for other new types of danger to the lawn mowers. Then just sit back and take a breather while someone else does the work for once.

Weed Control

Weed Control: Annual Grasses

If foreign, annual grasses germinate from seed in the disturbed soil below the new sod, they are noticed as paler-green, faster-growing grass in the seams between the rolls of sod. Mowing will even the appearance of the turf and these grasses only live until frost in the fall. The density of the turf will be thick enough next spring to inhibit the germination of annual grasses such as foxtail and goosegrass. If the new sod was not watered sufficiently and the sod pieces shrunk, it would be advisable to use a pre-emergent annual grass preventive treatment in the spring. Pre-emergent products do not allow annual grass seeds to germinate and should be applied in late April or early May.

Weed Control: Broadleaf Weeds

Generally, the density of the turfgrasses in new sod is so thick that broadleaf weeds cannot compete. If broadleaf weeds such as dandelions do germinate, they can be controlled by applying a granular weed and feed product or liquid spot treating of the weeds.

Disease and Insect Problems

Diseases and insect problems are hard to diagnose and advice should be sought from an expert. Do not apply chemicals haphazardly before the problem is identified.

There are two conditions that can lead to or contribute to lawn problems and diseases. One is over-fertilization. Do not add more fertilizer than the recommended rate, especially in hot, humid weather or in early spring. Over-fertilizing promotes excessive, fast, top growth and may accentuate disease development.

Thatch is the matting of undecomposed dead stems, leaves and roots in a layer just above the soil surface and below the green, vegetative growth. It is not grass clippings. Too much thatch keeps water from penetrating the soil and the root zone. Roots tend to grow into the thatch rather than deeply into the soil. Insects and diseases can easily establish themselves there.

Thatch layers 1/2 inch or more thick should be aerated to begin to break down this excessive thatch layer. Aeration by machine removes cores of thatch and soil. These plugs of soil deposited on the turf surface contain bacteria that begin to break down the thatch layer. Core aeration also opens up hardened, impenetrable soil and allows water, air and fertilizer to reach the grass roots.

All sodded lawns should be aerated annually after the first full year of growth.

Crew Cutters would be glad to help you with any more info or treatments, Just Call Us today!

Why? Crape Myrtle Pruning.

We often use crape myrtles in the landscape because they bloom all summer long. We also value them for their peeling bark, fall color and the grace of their natural form. It is as tough as it is beautiful.

The practice of chopping off the tops of crape myrtle has become very commonplace. Many people believe that it is required to promote flowering; some prune because the plant is too large for the space provided; others see their neighbors doing it and feel the need to follow suit. There are some instances in which heavy pruning is necessary, but light pruning is usually all that is needed. The type and amount of pruning depends on the desired shape and size of the plant.

Crape myrtle can be a low-maintenance plant, and the best way to ensure this is to choose the cultivar that best suits your landscape needs before planting. There are many new cultivars in different sizes and colors. The dwarf (3 to 6 feet) and semi-dwarf (7 to 15 feet) selections now available make it easy to choose the right size plant for a certain space.

Crape myrtles that mature between 5 and 15 feet include ‘Acoma’ (white flowers), ‘Hopi’ (light pink), ‘Comanchee’ (dark pink), ‘Zuni’ (lavender) and ‘Tonto’ (red). These are also resistant to powdery mildew, a fungus that attacks and distorts the leaves. Compact crape myrtles between 3 and 6 feet include ‘Hope’ (white), ‘Ozark Spring’ (lavender) and ‘Victor’ (red). Unfortunately, the compact crape myrtles are not resistant to powdery mildew.

If careful consideration is given to the projected size of the mature plant, a selection can be found that will not outgrow its boundaries and can be allowed to display its graceful beauty with minimal pruning. Crape myrtle does not require heavy pruning to promote bloom. Flowers are produced on new growth. It will produce flowers without any pruning, although it will produce larger flowers and bloom more profusely if at least lightly pruned. Pruning in late winter or early spring will stimulate vigorous new growth in the spring. Encourage a second bloom in summer by pruning flowers immediately after they fade.

This plant prefers hot, sunny climates and in South Carolina will grow to tree-size proportions. It is important that tree types are sited where they have a large area to spread. When given an ideal location, these tree types should be allowed to develop their natural style without whacking off their tops.

To develop a tree shape, remove all limbs growing from ground level except the three to five strongest limbs. As the tree matures, remove lower, lateral branches (“limbing up”) one-third to halfway up the height of the plant. Remove branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other and shoots growing into the center of the canopy. Make your cuts to a side branch or close to the trunk. Head back wayward and unbranched limbs. As it grows taller, remove lower branches as needed. Remove any future growth from the ground to retain the desired tree shape. This basal sprouting may occur whether the tree is being pruned or not. Pull these out when succulent instead of pruning them.

You may feel the need to improve the appearance by removing the seed heads in late winter or early spring before growth begins. This is recommended only if they are within reach. Once this becomes a tall, mature plant, allow nature to take its course – the seeds will drop, the plant will bloom, and the natural grace of the plant has been retained.

Consider all your options when confronted with a large, old crape myrtle in a space meant for a different shaped tree or shrub. To create clearance under the canopy, limb up old trees that have spread their lower limbs where they interfere with people or cars. Limb up above the roofline of a single story home to clear obstruction of a window or door. Eliminate one of the major trunks if it is leaning too close to a building. Only as a last result should you top a beautiful, old specimen to squeeze it into a confined space.

To keep a crape myrtle at a manageable height, prune moderately by removing all twiggy growth back to lower growing side branches. This will give the plant a more uniform appearance. As mentioned earlier, the best way to maintain a crape myrtle at a particular size is to plant a known cultivar that will mature at the desired height and spread.

If you have a crape myrtle in a spot where you want a low, compact plant, you have two options: (1)Dig it up and plant a new dwarf cultivar that will require little or no maintenance; (2)Prune the stems back to about six inches above the ground each year. Severe pruning will not kill or injure a healthy crape myrtle.

Practice corrective pruning to remove defective or dead branches. This should be done at the time the problem is detected. Otherwise, prune to remove lateral branches, small twigs or branches in the center to create more open space for sun and air movement while the plant is dormant (winter or early spring).Knowing when to call your local Landscaper is important!

Call us at Crew Cutters Landscaping LLC Today for more info or your Free Estimate!

When to dethatch your lawn.

The process of dethatching is hard on turf, so the ideal time to tackle this chore is right before grass enters its period of strongest growth. Because warm- and cool-season grasses grow most vigorously at different times during the year, the ideal time for dethatching also varies. It’s vital to know what kind of grass comprises your lawn before you dethatch.

Warm-Season Turf

In regions that experience frost and snow, dethatch warm-season grasses in late spring to early summer – well before heat arrives and the lawn’s water needs are high. In the warmest regions, including the Coastal North Carolina, dethatch warm-season grass in early spring, but be sure to wait until grass is actively growing. This means you should have mowed it once or twice.

Warm-season turf types:

  • Bahia grass
  • Bermudagrass
  • Buffalo grass (doesn’t usually develop thatch)
  • Centipede grass
  • St. Augustinegrass
  • Zoysiagrass

Cool-Season Turf

Dethatch cool-season turf types in early spring or early fall. Timing is critical in both cases. In early spring, dethatch after grass is actively growing – after you have mowed it once or twice. Time early fall dethatching to allow grass plenty of time to grow and re-establish before frost arrives.

Cool-season turf types:

  • Creeping bentgrass
  • Fescue (chewings, hard, red; tall fescue rarely needs dethatching)
  • Kentucky bluegrass
  • Rough bluegrass
  • Ryegrass (perennial that rarely needs dethatching)

Timing Tips

  • Dethatch when soil is moist, not dry. If soil is too wet, dethatching may yank turf out by the roots, creating large bare spots.
  • It’s best to dethatch during cooler weather.
  • Mow the lawn to half its normal height right before dethatching.
  • Postpone dethatching – even if it’s needed – during times of drought, watering restrictions or intense heat waves.
  • Avoid heavy dethatching in mid- to late fall for any kind of lawn. Late-season dethatching sends grass into winter weak and damaged, which can affect survival

Six Outer Banks Landscaping Maintenance Tips

Outer Banks Landscaping is an act of men to verify nature’s beauty that needs consisted maintenance. Unlike natural landscapes, landscape made by man should take more attention and expertise because the improvised materials may not stand to natural inclinations of nature.

Here are some tips for your landscaping maintenance:

1. Have someone to continuously clean the surroundings. Cleanliness is next to Godliness. A clean surrounding of your landscape maintains the aura of cleanliness and peacefulness.

When there are trashes around you can’t expect nature to be peaceful because even they can’t speak, their natural existence should not be bothered by plastics and cans and any other man made materials.

2. Have someone to tend the plants. Plants need water and enough sunlight. Of course, your landscape is outside so they are having enough sunlight.

Don’t forget about the plants which can be shaded by buildings in your landscape area. Water your plants every afternoon at about four o’clock and every morning at six. When it rains you can postpone watering for the next day.

Cultivate the soil of plants in pots. This will give them enough carbon dioxide for their photosynthesis. By doing all these tending, you can expect a good result with your flowers and other kinds of plants in your landscape.

3. Maintain the grooming of your grasses. Good carpet grasses should be groomed every once in a while. When you see that they need some trimming, let them be trimmed.

Carpet grasses are good to look at and a good place to lie down to ease some of the stress you are carrying. So let your worries fly away when you are relaxing in your carpet grass along with the breeze your plants bring.

4. Maintain the running of the fountain or other man-made facilities in your landscape area. Have someone to attend to your man-made facilities. You can do it yourself if you know how.

Clean them once or twice a week. A clean facility always works well and maintaining them clean makes their lifespan longer.

5. Take good care of your animals. If you have a dog or a parrot in your landscape area, make sure you feed them well and keep them and their houses clean. Doing this brings you healthy benefits.

6. Talk to your animals, orchids and other flowery plants. Talking with your pets and plants may seem absurd but it is scientifically proven to be good, not only to them but to you.

You know what they say, that dogs are man’s best friend. They can comfort you in your times of distress and you can make your dogs love you more while your orchids are blooming even more.

These are some basic tips in maintaining your landscape area. Have fun!